Feature Species: Slender Tree Frog (Litoria adelaidensis)

So far this summer has shaped up to be one of rather tropical characteristics. Warm days, high humidity and unseasonal summer rains in the southwest have created the perfect breeding ground for an array of insects.

With all the extra water around this summer, the insectivorous Slender Tree Frog, along with many other native frogs have been out and about making their presence known along the Track and in our gardens.

With their loud calls, these little beauties are often in great interest to our pets. Be sure to keep a close eye on your dogs and cats if you happen to suspect one of these little guys, or any other type of native animal may be living in your backyard.

Slender Tree Frog

A striking green Slender Tree Frog

They are a small frog, reaching a maximum length of 4.7cms with a narrow and tapering head. They have long slender un-webbed fingers, however their long legs end with webbed toes. These little Amphibians come in a range of colours, from green to all shades of brown.

Often making an appearance through winter and spring, it has been a real treat to spot a few of these guys enjoying all the water and feasting on a variety of tasty morsels so early in the year!

Not all snakes are dangerous!

The Elapognathus coronets (Western crowned snake) is commonly spotted by our walkers on the Cape to Cape Track. Growing up to 70cm’s in length, this small snake will usually freeze when approached but will timidly squirm away with any sudden movement. Active throughout most of the year they can often be found sun baking on flattened sedge or sand patches. Their diet typically consists of small frogs and lizards and thankfully, they are not known to be aggressive or venomous to people.

Elapognathus coronatus

The Western Crowned Snake captured alongside the Cape to Cape Track.