Move for Mental Health

Kylianne Farrell is the passionate and inspiring director of The Movement Room and driver of the #moveformentalhealth hike. From November 12th-19th 2017, 11 incredible women joined us to hike from Cape Naturaliste to Cape Leeuwin over 7 days in support of the Gidget Foundation.

Kylianne’s mission for her business ‘The Movement Room‘ is to offer her clients Integrated Movement Counselling. She provides women with emotional and physical support by using the power of movement as an active coping strategy against mental illness and emotional struggles.

After approaching Cape to Cape Explorer Tours in August to organise the trip, Kylianne recruited another 10 inspiring women and together, they have so far managed to raise $33,920.68 for the Gidget Foundation’s Start Talking campaign. The Gidget Foundation is a not for profit organisation supporting the emotional wellbeing of new parents and their families. The Gidget Foundation also provide education and awareness programs for health professionals and the community to learn more about Perinatal Anxiety and Depression. The Start Talking campaign aims to offer telehealth service for men and women in rural, remote and indigenous communities affected by perinatal health disorders. These women have managed to raise enough money to support almost 34 families with this service for an entire year!

Six of the #moveformentalhealth hikers at a very successful fundraising event of where they raised $5.5k alone in their home town of Karratha.

Seven days of back-to-back full day hiking on the Cape to Cape Track is challenging on many levels. The week these women hiked coincided with Perinatal Depression and Anxiety Awareness Week. “Raising awareness will allow those who are struggling in silence to have permission and courage to speak up and seek help so they can start their road to recovery” Kylianne said after feeling the nostalgia of completing her first day on the Track. Throughout the week, three of these new mothers were expressing milk on the Track! What absolutely legends! Hiking alone can be challenging but adding this extra dimension to the walk is truly inspiring. “Hiking and expressing – It’s a total mission, thanks to Laura for being my expressing partner in crime.” Kylianne said after a tough day out on the Track.

Kylianne simultaneously expressing and hiking, what an inspiration!

After their incredible achievement, these ladies spent their final night in Margaret River sharing why each of the ladies chose to participate in the hike and what they had learnt. “I have never experienced gratitude like I have over the past 6 months but more so in the last week than ever before. The deepest kind that can be felt where I have been bought to tears…a lot”, Kylianne said, reflecting on the experience. “For myself I hiked and made the opportunity to others to give a voice to those who’s stories are still yet to be heard and shared, I hiked for those who like me have been diagnosed with physical injuries and dysfunctions and mental illness, that feel that because of those things they feel a shadow of who they once were”.

A snapshot of the beautiful landscape traversed by these inspiring women over 7 days, thanks to Rhythm and Hart.

Cape to Cape Explorer Tours is humbled to host these women on their incredible journey and proud to support The Gidget Foundation. If you are looking to raise money for a cause close to your heart whilst reconnecting with nature and challenging yourself both mentally and physically, we would love to hear from you. Cape to Cape Explorer Tours is an award-winning, local company, we support the Track and our community. Our guides and staff all live in the area, are professionally trained and have an intimate knowledge of the Track and the Margaret River region, not to mention a passion for walking and people.

Move for Mental Health

Come adventure with us and The Movement Room as we hike from lighthouse to lighthouse, along stunning coastal landscape from Cape Naturaliste to Cape Leeuwin, to raise awareness for mamas who are struggling emotionally with post natal depression/anxiety. Allowing each hiker with the opportunity to experience and explore how movement/exercise can be a powerful coping strategy in the journey to recovery.

MORE INFORMATION HERE!

All funds raised will be donated to The Gidget Foundation who is doing amazing work, creating change and impacting those mamas that need it most.

Hike for yourself or hike in the place of someone that you know has or is struggling with depression/anxiety.

In registering as a “Move for Mental Health” hiker we ask that you commit to raising at least $500 in sponsorship (hopefully more!) from friends, family, colleagues and maybe those who want to be a part of creating change in your networks. For more information on sponsorship and fundraising contact Kylianne on kylianne@themovementroom.com.au

Cooler Weather for Walking

The winter months are a great time to get out into the elements and warm up the good old fashioned way with some nature based exercise. There are many things you can do to stay dry, warm and safe throughout your winter hikes and here is a list of some of our best tips.

warm winter walking

Check the Weather Forecast

Before heading out into the elements it is a good idea to check the temperature, the wind direction and speed as well as if any rain is forecasted so you can prepare both physically and mentally for the conditions.

Replenish Your Energy and Fluids

Sometimes in the cooler weather it can be more challenging to remember to drink enough water, but it is important to stay hydrated on a hike of any length. Your body also uses up more energy trying to stay warm so it’s important to bring a lot of high-energy foods like trail mix, fruit and bread to sustain energy.

Layer Your Clothing

Wearing the right gear while out in the elements can be the most important factor in determining your experience during a light sprinkle of rain, a storm or even snow. Generally, the modern technical clothing available to us in the 21st century is designed to the be used as a layering system where each layer is serves a purpose in retaining warmth. Therefore, you are able to combine different layers to tackle different conditions which is particularly important for activities like hiking so you avoid overheating whilst on the move but still stay warm when you are taking breaks. Typically there are three integral layers that you will need:

Base Layer: This is the layer closest to your skin so it needs to be breathable but moisture wicking. Your base layer should either be wool or synthetic, both of which have different advantages and disadvantages.

Mid Layer: Your mid layer should be used as insulation, but should also be breathable. Often, fleece, wool, synthetic or down are the top picks for hikers depending on the weather conditions.

Outer Layer: An outer layer should shield you against the rain and wind. Fitting snug over your base and mid layers, it is important to make sure your shell is comfortable and easy to access.

Small Pieces of Clothing Make a Big Difference

It is always a good idea to pack a beanie, some gloves and an extra pair or two of socks on your hike. These lightweight accessories are worth their weight in gold when you are cold.

Protect Your Pack

It’s a great idea to pack a waterproof cover for your pack, even if wet weather isn’t forecasted.

Thermos

There is nothing like pouring a hot tea or coffee out in the wilderness while taking a break from a hike! It’s also handy for carrying soup which can make a yummy lunch teamed with some fresh bread.

Plan your Breaks

Take shorter breaks more frequently so that you do not loose too much heat. If you do require a longer break to eat or recharge, add another layer and remove it once you begin hiking and warm up again.

With some planning and the right gear, winter can provide some of the most rewarding and memorable hiking experiences. Cape to Cape Explorer Tours offer all of our self-guided walks throughout the winter months and we would love to help you stay warm and fit this season!

Salmon seek warm water for spawning

The migration of the Western Australian Salmon (Arripis truttaceus) draw crowds in their thousands to Australia’s south-west corner every year. Although not as delicious as the mouth-watering pink fleshed Atlantic salmon (Salmo solar), and not at all related, the Aussie salmon sure is good fun to fish! More closely related to herring or tommy ruff, anglers enjoy fishing for these fighters right from the beach where fish will often take to the air and run hard out to see once hooked. The fish are also sought out by commercial fisherman, with some licensee’s historically catching over 2,500 tonne of fish per year.

 

Salmon fisherman

A Salmon fisherman from the south coast (Photo: ABC Rural – Tyne logan)

The fish begin to arrive in mid-March and tend to stay around all through April after migrating along Australia’s south coast from as far as Victoria and even Tasmania. Adult fish form large schools along exposed beaches and rocky reefs. Western Australian Salmon can grow up to one meter in length and can reach a whopping 9kgs. Mostly, they feed on bait fish and they are eaten by sharks, seals, dolphins and of corse, people.

A school of Western Australian Salmon under water

An underwater shot of the Western Australian Salmon (Photo: WA Museum – Barry Hutchins)

They make their journey west to take advantage of the Leeuwin Current, which runs from north to south along the Australia’s west coast, around Cape Leeuwin and then eastward along the south coast. Teamed with the offshore winds, these conditions are perfect for the fish to spawn.

A school of Salmon in the clear waters of Contos Beach.

An uninterrupted school of Salmon in the clear waters of Contos Beach.

Eggs and newly hatched fish are carried in the Leeuwin Current and settle along the south coast between South Australia and Tasmania where they mature for three to four years before moving westward to live in schools around Hopetoun and Esperance. This is where most of the schools we see along the Cape to Cape Track head home to after their visit to the Ngari Cape Marine Park to spawn.

School of Australian salmon at Contos

An enormous ball of salmon spotted from Contos Cliffs

Feature Species: Slender Tree Frog (Litoria adelaidensis)

So far this summer has shaped up to be one of rather tropical characteristics. Warm days, high humidity and unseasonal summer rains in the southwest have created the perfect breeding ground for an array of insects.

With all the extra water around this summer, the insectivorous Slender Tree Frog, along with many other native frogs have been out and about making their presence known along the Track and in our gardens.

With their loud calls, these little beauties are often in great interest to our pets. Be sure to keep a close eye on your dogs and cats if you happen to suspect one of these little guys, or any other type of native animal may be living in your backyard.

Slender Tree Frog

A striking green Slender Tree Frog

They are a small frog, reaching a maximum length of 4.7cms with a narrow and tapering head. They have long slender un-webbed fingers, however their long legs end with webbed toes. These little Amphibians come in a range of colours, from green to all shades of brown.

Often making an appearance through winter and spring, it has been a real treat to spot a few of these guys enjoying all the water and feasting on a variety of tasty morsels so early in the year!

Hens Day Hike a Hit!

Hens group in front of the bus at Smiths Beach before the hike

Getting ready for the hike at Smiths Beach!

Last week a group of lovely local ladies joined us to take a look at their own backyard and enjoy a pre-wedding celebration for their dear friend Mandy! A hen’s day with a difference, we started the adventure with a hike from Smiths Beach to the Aquarium.

Hiking through the granite gneiss south of Smiths Beach

Hiking through the granite gneiss south of Smiths Beach

With the weather on our side, we were presented with light winds and clear waters, making a dip in the sheltered waters a highlight for many! In the shade of a marquee we enjoyed a delicious and fresh roll from the Margaret River Bakery before a game of quoits and bocce.

Cooling off at the Aquarium

Cooling off at the Aquarium

We continued our hike along to coast to eventually reach the protected nook at Canal Rocks. Indulging in an afternoon feast of fresh fruit, dips, cheese, chocolate coated strawberries and of corse, champagne!

Enjoying the shade of a Melaleuca tree

Enjoying the shade of a Melaleuca tree

Congratulations to Mr & Mrs Mills, we wish you a happy and long future together :).

West Coast Swimming Club joins us for performance camp!

Up and coming athletes from the UWA West Coast Swimming Club made their way down to Margaret River for a ‘Performance Camp’ to welcome in the new year. In the pool at the Margaret River Recreation Centre and out on the Cape to Cape Track, everyone had a great time focussing on their skills and immersing themselves in the elements.

West Coast Swimming Club

Day 1 – Walking out of Smiths Beach.

After a training session in the pool, the first day out on the Track saw these young fish out of water walking from Smiths Beach to Injidup! The team took a dip in the ocean and enjoyed a little snorkel at The Aquarium to cool off.

Snorkling at the Aquarium

Cooling off and enjoying a snorkel at the Aquarium

The following day was spent at the beautiful coastal hamlet of Gracetown where these kids completed a variety of team building challenges. From Spider’s Web, to Leonardo’s Bridge, to Raft Building, the group excelled through the activities by maximising communication and assigning competent leaders.

Launching the raft in Gracetown

Launching their competed raft into the bay at Gracetown

It was a really rewarding day for the kids and gave them the opportunity to get out of the pool and reconnect with nature together, whilst having to think on their feet.

Spiders Web

Spiders Web in action!

A great time was had by everyone involved! Well down to all the swimmers and we hope to see them back next year to take on some more of the Cape to Cape Track and continue developing their leadership and team work skills!!!

Leonardos Bridge

The team successfully constructed Leonardo’s Bridge

Looking for a camp for you and your team? Whether you are professional athletes, from the corporate world or just want to pull your organisation together for something fun and rewarding we can tailor a package to suit your needs. Email us at info@capetocapetours.com.au so we can meet your needs and create a program to suit your outcomes.

Year One’s from Margaret River Independent School take on the Track!

The students from the Margaret River Independent School are always so much fun to take out exploring on the Cape to Cape Track! These local kids spend their days learning in small classes in a beautiful bush setting about 10kms south of Margaret River. The schools vision is to provide an environment that caters for the whole child in development of lifetime learning skills as well as academic and creative excellence. This year, the year one students joined our managing director Gene for an overnight camp full of leadership and team building activities.

Gene chatting to the kids out on the Track.

Gene with the Year 1 students from Margaret River Independent School

We are always impressed by the knowledge and respect that these children have for their local environment! These 6 and 7 year olds are often finishing our sentences when we begin talking about some of our endemic flora and fauna species. Their enthusiasm and connection with nature is inspiring.

Kids in Boranup Forest

Enjoying some shade in Boranup Forest

As well as walking through the bush, we worked on some of our favourite team building and leadership activities including Spiders Web and Pipeline.

Being briefed on the Spiders Web activity

Being briefed on the Spiders Web activity

The challenge was set for the children to make their way through the web of the mighty Hamelin Spider, which the kids took to quite well. Without facilitation, they formed a circle, selected a leader and formulated a plan that would see all of their classmates get safely through the web.

Forming a circle in the shade to formulate a plan

An empowering moment for the children

The kids were very impressed with themselves after the activity concluded, and rightfully so! Who would have thought that a group of 6 and 7 year olds could make such a great team!?

Celebrating Spiders Web success

Celebrating Spiders Web success

The class also demonstrated amazing patience and cooperation throughout their pipeline activity, which they very quickly got the hang of. Returning to the Pipeline activity throughout the walk allows the group to try and better their score that is measured by how fast they can move the ball through the pipeline with dropping it to the ground!

Pipeline in action!

Pipeline in action!

The camp finished with an expedition through the awe-inspiring and mighty Giants Cave! With crawling, ladders and sliding, each one of the children made it the entire way through the 500m underground labyrinth. It is always such an empowering experience to reconnect children with their natural environment. As you can see, Cape to Cape Explorer Tours love hosting camps for school and youth groups! We are more than happy to creative a package that suits the needs of your group. Check out our Schools page to find out more information or send us through an email at info@capetocapetours.com.au today!

A special thanks to Lauren Trickett for the incredible photos she took throughout the camp.