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“Conservation endures as a living discipline because it is inhabited by a magnificent collection of people. Only by working together can we create solutions to the most vexing problems we face.” Carter Roberts President & CEO

 

Cape to Cape Explorer Tours is proud to be contributing to the World Wildlife Fund and their extensive work to protect and save the endangered Green Sea Turtle. Sea turtles are dependent on beaches for nesting. Uncontrolled coastal development, vehicle traffic on beaches, and other human activities have directly destroyed or disturbed sea turtle nesting beaches around the world. Green turtle feeding grounds such as seagrass beds are also at risk from coastal development onshore, which leads to pollution and sedimentation in the nearby water. Cape to Cape Explorer Tours are making a monthly donation to the cause, and sharing a closer relationship with WWF and to assist in making a greater impact in protecting threatened wildlife, exceptional places and diverse communities worldwide.

 

 

ABOUT WORLD WILDLIFE FUND

 

In 1961, a limited number of organizations around the world—such as the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) and The Conservation Foundation—were trying to meet conservation needs, but were desperately short of funds.

 

The first call for broad support was the Morges Manifesto, signed in 1961 by 16 of the world’s leading conservationists, including biologist and African wildlife enthusiast Sir Julian Huxley, IUCN vice president Sir Peter Scott and director-general of the British Nature Conservancy E. M. Nicholson. The Morges Manifesto stated that while the expertise to protect the world environment existed, the financial support to achieve this protection did not. The decision was made to establish World Wildlife Fund as an international fundraising organization to work in collaboration with existing conservation groups and bring substantial financial support to the conservation movement on a worldwide scale.

 

For nearly 60 years, WWF has been protecting the future of nature.

 

The world’s leading conservation organization, WWF works in 100 countries and is supported by more than one million members in the United States and close to five million globally. WWF’s unique way of working combines global reach with a foundation in science, involves action at every level from local to global, and ensures the delivery of innovative solutions that meet the needs of both people and nature.

 

Together, we can achieve WWF’s mission to conserve nature and reduce the most pressing threats to the diversity of life on Earth.

Together, in partnership with foundations, governments, businesses, communities, individuals and our more than six million members, we can conserve many of the world’s most ecologically important regions.

Together, we can

  • Protect and restore species and their habitats
  • Strengthen local communities’ ability to conserve the natural resources they depend upon
  • Transform markets and policies to reduce the impact of the production and consumption of commodities
  • Ensure that the value of nature is reflected in decisions made by individuals, communities, governments and businesses
  • Mobilize hundreds of millions of people to support conservation

 

Together, we can protect life on our planet—including our own.

Because together, anything is possible.

together possible

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WHAT IS WWF DOING? –

1. ELIMINATING BYCATCH

WWF aims to reduce turtle bycatch by working with fisheries to switch to more turtle-friendly fishing hooks (“circle” hooks) and advocates for the use of devices that exclude turtles from nets. We run an international competition called Smart Gear to attract creative new ways to solve bycatch problems and to advance those ideas. Winning devices have been designed to minimize the bycatch of turtles on tuna longlines and help turtles avoid gillnets. We work with fishermen to help them save turtles caught in fishing gear. We also use satellite devices to track turtle movements to help prevent future interactions between fisheries and turtles.

2. PROTECTING SEA TURTLE HABITAT

WWF works around the world to establish marine protected areas (MPA) to ensure sea turtles have a safe place to nest, feed and migrate freely. We encourage governments to strengthen legislation and provide funding for sea turtle protection. WWF also supports the monitoring and patrolling of turtle nests in many parts of the world to equip local turtle conservationists. This often leads to ecotourism opportunities and offers alternative livelihoods.

3. SATTELITE TRACKING

Satellite telemetry allows researchers to track sea turtles as they swim from place to place. These satellite tags do not harm the turtles in any way and are designed to eventually fall off. The data will tell us where important feeding areas are, help us understand migration patterns, and anticipate where turtles may come in contact with fisheries and their gear.

 

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